• Anonymous
    February 2, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Your :Mobile No 040*****has won £6,500,000 GBP in the BET365 Jackpot,To redeem goto www.m65i.com ,click CLAIM enter Ref#: CC74117Q .Helpline: helpuk @ post.com

    I got this text and don’t know if it’s a scam or not
  • Anonymous
    February 15, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Your :Mobile No 040*****has won £6,500,000 GBP in the BET365 Jackpot,To redeem goto www.m65i.com ,click CLAIM enter Ref#: CC74117Q .Helpline: helpuk @ post.com... from no 0431 859 438 got that on Tuesday 12th Feb 2019 and
    on the 3/2/19 got ...You have an unclaimed inheritance on your Surname kindly contact this email:matt2matt17 @ mail.com for more details Regards and it was from 0433 760 451.

    I did nothing with either one. Posting here for others to be aware!
  • Anonymous
    November 30, 2018
    SMS
    Australia
    Your :Mobile No 04******** has won £4,000,000 GBP in the Coca-Cola, To redeem go to www.mbscollas.com ,click CLAIM enter Ref#: CC74117Q
  • Anonymous
    February 16, 2019
    SMS
    Australia
    Caller: Txt

    My partner recieved the same txt today, for bet365 with the same code. It will send you to a chinese website selling the domains. A failed attempt at scamming to me.
  • Anonymous
    March 1, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Your:Mobile No 040*****has won £6,500,000 GBP in the BET365 Jackpot,To redeem goto www.m65s.com ,click CLAIM enter Ref#: CC74117Q .Helpline: helpuk @ post.com

    Was from: 0478 115 960
  • Anonymous
    December 12, 2018
    Unknown
    Australia
    also number 0432 987 691
  • Anonymous
    May 17, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    How can you win $6,500.000 in some thing you did not enter ? what a joke of course it a scam
    I got the same Message as the rest of you, just delete it, because it bullsh*t
  • Anonymous
    April 30, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Your:Mobile No 040*****has won £6,500,000 GBP in the BET365 Jackpot,To redeem goto www.m65s.org ,click CLAIM enter Ref#: CC74117Q .Helpline: info @ mobcollas.com

    I also got this message beware!!!
  • Anonymous
    April 10, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Caller: 0431 100 674

    it looks like a scam I got the same message today.
  • Betty
    April 1, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Caller: 0431 100 674

    This number send me message I have one same amount of money this is sick freaks just trying to get few dollars
  • Anonymous
    March 30, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    I received a text message stating I have won 6,500 english pounds. Seems like a scam to me
  • Anonymous
    July 19, 2019
    SMS
    Australia
    Caller: mobcollas.com

    A scam using various numbers. Operating from a server in a world heritage area in New south Wales, Australia.
  • Anonymous
    July 10, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    I'v won 6,500,000 pds on BET365 promo. Scam! Is the Pope a catholic. U bettcha
  • Bernadette
    July 10, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Caller: Text message - 0413 793 491

    I received this text message too regarding winning 6.5 million Euros via BET365 Donation.
    This is a SCAM. Please follow the GOLDEN RULES BELOW to spot a SCAM.


    How to Spot a Lottery Scam

    If you have received any suspicious correspondence, work through this checklist to see if you are getting scammed.
    1. Did you enter that lottery on that date?

    The golden rule for spotting a scam. If you did not play, either by buying a ticket or playing online, you cannot win.
    2. Are you being asked for payment?

    You will never be asked to pay a handling fee or any sort of charge by a legitimate company in order for your winnings to be released. An official company would pay your winnings in full and the only cost to you may be tax in the future.
    3. Is the prize referenced realistic?

    Look carefully at the prize, currency and lottery name to see if it makes sense and is consistent. For example, if you live in Canada and receive an email from a UK lottery telling you that you have won 10 million Indian rupees - that is a sign that this isn’t real.
    4. Are you pressured to respond?

    Lottery prizes do have expiry dates, but in most cases players will usually have several months or sometimes even a year or more from the day of the draw to come forward. A legitimate company would link to their terms and conditions if they made reference to any time constraints on claiming a prize.
    5. Are you being told to keep the news confidential?

    This is a trick used to scare people. There is no reason why you can’t tell family or friends straight away about a genuine win. The scammers are just trying to limit the chances of their fraud being exposed so that they will not be reported to the police or to the genuine company they are pretending to be from.
    6. Is the message professional?

    Fraudsters are becoming increasingly sophisticated with the design and content of their scams, but you should still note how professional it looks. First, check to see if the lottery organisation actually exists. ‘Euro Mega Millions Corporation’ might sound plausible to both EuroMillions and Mega Millions players, but it’s actually completely fictitious. If the message is riddled with spelling mistakes and poor grammar, this is further warning it is probably a scam.
    7. Do they know your name?

    If you play online you could receive a genuine automated winner notification without your name, but look out for a message starting ‘Dear winner’ or ‘Dear account holder’, as it is a sign of a possible scam.
    8. What does the email address look like?

    Take a good look at the email address. Does it look like a genuine company’s email handle. A legitimate lottery will never send out a message from a personal Gmail or Hotmail account.
    Types of Scam

    The most common type of scam informs you that you have won a lottery. You may then be told that you have to pay a handling fee of some kind before receiving your money, or that there has been a mistake and you have been overpaid and must return some of your winnings. Even if the scammer does not ask you for money straight away, they may just try to open the lines of communication so they can gain access to personal or financial information further down the line.

    A variation on this theme is a scam where you are told that your email or phone number has been randomly selected as a winner, perhaps in a ‘second chance’ draw.

    Another type of scam involves the fraudster pretending to be a lottery winner who wants to share their money with others. The name on the message may be the same as a real winner, claiming to have set up some sort of trust. While some winners are very charitable, they would not randomly contact strangers to give a part of their prize away.

    Scammers may also try to convince people that they have reduced lottery tickets for sale, declaring that it is a great opportunity to play for a fraction of the actual cost. This is usually done over the phone in an attempt to find out bank card details.
    Communication Methods

    Email - Scam emails are becoming increasingly common, as they allow fraudsters to contact lots of people at the touch of a button for little or even no financial cost. The approach taken in an email scam closely mirrors that of a postal scam, with recipients directed how to respond.
    Letter – You may receive something through the post saying that you have won a prize and need to register your claim before you can receive the money. Postal scams target hundreds or even thousands of people simultaneously and are usually designed to look as authentic as possible, complete with various official-looking logos. You may be asked to call a telephone number to make your claim, or return a ‘claim form’ to a response address provided.
    Phone – If you receive a call saying you have won a prize, it is possible that the scammer will be very good at sounding professional and knowledgeable enough to make you feel confident that the news is genuine. You may be asked to provide personal information such as name, address, date of birth and so on, as well as financial information such as a credit/debit card or bank account number. The usual explanation is that you need to pay a handling charge, your card can be used as proof of identity so that the prize can be processed, or so that the prize can be deposited directly into your account. This is, of course, a lie.
    Text – You may receive a text message stating that you are the winner of a cash prize draw, mobile raffle, mobile lottery game or similar, and that your number has been chosen to win a cash prize. However, if you call the number provided you can expect hefty call fees, plus you may even get your phone hacked if you do respond. If you reply in any way, you are enabling the scammers to access the information on your phone, SIM card or even data from websites you have visited.
    Social Media – Scammers can now send messages through social media platforms, perhaps telling you that your profile has been chosen at random to win a ‘Facebook Raffle’ or ‘Facebook Lottery’. However, there is no such game organised by Facebook and never has been.

    Golden Rules to Avoiding Lottery Scams

    Follow these three key guidelines to help ensure you don’t get conned by a lottery scammer.
    1 – Participation

    First, remember that you cannot possibly win a lottery prize unless you have bought yourself a ticket for that game. Scammers will try and tell you that some lottery or other has randomly picked you to win or entered a number on your behalf, but it is not true. If you haven’t bought a ticket, you won’t win a lottery prize. Bearing this rule in mind will go a long way to making you immune to the scammers.
    2 – Never send payment

    A legitimate lottery will never ask for you to make a payment before your winnings can be processed. Do not give a scammer any personal or financial information, and do not respond to any suspicious correspondence or open any link in a suspicious email. If you have already responded, then break off contact straight away. If you have provided personal details, alert your bank immediately. You should also report any scam you received to the relevant authorities.
    3 - Claim direct

    Should you receive a telephone call, postal or email communication which you really believe is genuine – and you remember buying yourself a ticket for the game in question – don’t simply go along with whatever is requested of you. Instead, dig out your ticket (if you purchased it offline), take a look at the small print on the reverse of that ticket and follow the official claims process as described. And of course, if you purchased your ticket online you should log into your account for the official claims process of your lottery vendor.
  • Anonymous
    June 29, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Caller: 0424 293 445

    you have an unclaimed inheritance on your Surname kindly contact this email helpuk @ post.com for more details
  • Anonymous
    June 15, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Caller: +6150 233175

    YOU HAVE UNCLAIMED INHERITANCE ON YOUR SURNAME KINDLY CONTACT THIS EMAIL: help_uk @ post.com
  • Anonymous
    June 8, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Stop wasting my time aseholes
  • Anonymous
    June 8, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    scam i got one too, they must have a lot of prize money floating about, cheers
  • Anonymous
    May 23, 2019
    Unknown
    Australia
    Caller: someone said t5he same to me that i have won some money but thing i might be a scam has anyone got there winning money from this company let me know its GBP BET365 AND REF NUMBER CC74117Q ???????

    WHAT DO YOU THING ABOUT THIS IS IT A SCAM OR NOT??????
  • Anonymous
    May 22, 2019
    SMS
    Australia
    Caller: 0481 738 225

    Your :Mobile No 040*****has won £6,500,000 GBP in the BET365 Jackpot,To redeem goto www.m65i.com ,click CLAIM enter Ref#: CC74117Q
    I never check these as I know they are a scam (definitely now I've checked with everyone here)! thank you

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